Blog of Interest to Law Students

3L Students, 0L Pre-Law, 4 Graduates, 2L Students, 1L Students, Law School Exams, Law Job Hunt, All Articles 1 Comment »

Here is a blog that may interest many law students: Legal Underground. I especially liked the Weekly Law School Roundup reviewing notable law student blog posts, the discussion regarding a paperless office from an article written by the same author, and his review of the most interesting posts for the month. The blog covers exams, advice from students, jobs, and much more.

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Summer Jobs for the Jobless Law Student

2L Students, 1L Students, Law Job Hunt, All Articles 2 Comments »

The increasing number of law students often makes the hunt for a summer job more difficult. Here are a few tips for quickly lining up a summer legal job so your resume doesn’t have a gap:

  • Visit your school’s job office to get their advice and learn about current job openings.
  • Visit your school’s legal volunteering office. While these jobs don’t pay, the experience is often just as valuable on a resume as a paid job.
  • Offer to work at a firm as an intern (no pay). Many smaller firms will still accept interns in May or early June.
  • Volunteer for a legal aid group, charity, or your state bar association.
  • Offer to assist one of your professors on their projects this summer.
  • If all else fails, sign up for summer classes so at least your resume doesn’t have a gap.
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For Incoming Law Students: Why Law Schools Weigh Your LSAT Score so Heavily

0L Pre-Law, All Articles No Comments »

First, congratulations on your admission!

If you wondered why law schools focus more on LSAT scores than GPA, this article will answer your question.  In short, this Fordham Law School professor explains that 1) nearly all students look equal (like saints) based on their personal statements alone, 2) a strong GPA at some schools represents greater academic performance than at others, so GPAs alone are not an accurate measurement, and 3) LSAT scores are the only standardized way to compare students.  However, I think it is unfortunate that students with years of strong academic performance can be hurt by simply having a bad testing day.  But maybe this is a necessary evil.

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Best Study Aids for New Law Students - Part 3: Nutshell Subject Reviews

0L Pre-Law, All Articles 2 Comments »

There are three types of Study Aids. The first was case summaries. The second was what I call subject guides. The third is Nutshells—or, books in the Nutshell Series. These are different from subject guides because subject guides are presented in outline format—these are not outline format. Nutshells are like reading a book explaining the law. It is a fairly thorough review of a subject. Here are examples Read the rest of this article »

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Best Study Aids for New Law Students - Part 2: Subject Guides

0L Pre-Law, 1L Students 1 Comment »

There are three types of Study Aids, which students informally call law school outlines. The first was case summaries. The second is what I call subject guides. These provide a comprehensive outline of subjects. Here are examples of Emanuel Law Outlines and Gilbert Law Summaries Read the rest of this article »

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Best Study Aids for New Law Students - Part 1: Case Summaries

0L Pre-Law, 1L Students, All Articles 1 Comment »

There are three types of Study Aids. The first will be discussed here.

There are books that give you a summarized version of the cases that are probably in your textbook in a particular class. Some of these study aids are customized to the most popular textbooks, so they present the cases in order. You can see some examples from Amazon.com, which normally has the best prices:

Often these are “keyed” to a casebook, which means the order of cases and topics in the study aid will be the same as your particular casebook.  If a study aid is keyed to a casebook, it normally will say “Keyed to (author name)” on the cover. A keyed study aid is nice because it saves a little time finding a case, but it is not always available, nor is it necessary.

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Advice for Soon-to-Be Law Students

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The best advice for students starting law school in the fall is to buy this book: Law School Confidential.

But here is another article I thought was valuable reading for people wondering what law school will be like: Advice for First-Year Law Students.

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Don’t Start Fall Classes Cold — Get a Head Start

4 Graduates, 0L Pre-Law, 3L Students, 2L Students, All Articles 3 Comments »

This is one of the best, little-known tips to getting an advantage in law school that I’ve seen: Listen to lectures for all your classes this summer, and when you enter class this fall, you will already have a general understanding of major concepts, terms, and policies. You can listen to these tapes and CDs while you are exercising, driving in the car, or other convenient times. Then when you start class, you already have an overview of the subject, and you can focus on the finer details of the law, while most other students are trying to understand the general concepts.

The Sum & Substance series by West Publishing is one of the best. (The Law School Legends Series is also good.) Read the rest of this article »

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